This Week in Books: All the Feels

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Not feeling well this weekend, I got a LOT of reading done. Silver linings and all that jazz.

THEN

It’s incredibly unusual these days for me to read a book in less than 48 hours. I just happened to read two such page-turners back to back this week. Denton Little’s Deathdate by Lance Rubin is delightful! With a clever premise of (most) humans knowing the day they’re going to die, we see how 17-year-old Denton Little chooses to spend his last few days. Surprisingly hilarious, I couldn’t get enough of Denton and his friends, and I can’t wait to read the sequel (yes, you read that right).

During my afternoon with Jay Asher, I knew that I’d like his newest book, What Light, but I had no idea that ALL. THE. FEELS would keep me reading it all night long. Besides being a really sweet romance and a great reminder that people are capable of change and deserve second chances, the premise of being a Christmas tree farmer and having two lives because of it (one on the farm 11 months out of the year and one in another state selling tress on a lot from Thanksgiving to Christmas) was fascinating.

NOW

A dystopian novel about a reality survival show, The Last One by Alexandra Olivia was difficult to get into at first with chapters alternating between the first-person perspective of the main character, Zoo, and an omniscient third-person narrator’s point-of-view (so that we learn about the other contestants of the reality show). Being a fan of Survivor, and reality TV in general, I’m kind of loving the premise. If the twist is what I think it is, the story is much darker than it first appears. I’m about halfway through and am looking forward to seeing where the story takes me.

NEXT

My friend Amy Carol Reeves, author of the awesome YA Ripper trilogy, invited me to Joy Callaway’s book signing on Tuesday where I picked up her hot-off-the-press historical novel, Secret Sisters, about the very first sororities. I can’t wait to dig into this rich history and learn these sisters’ secrets.

What does your week in books look like?

 

Linking up with #TWIB and Mama Kat’s Writing Workshop (Prompt 4: Book Review!)

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Mama’s Losin’ It

 

 

 

 

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Reading Roundup: What I Read in May

I somehow plowed through four books this month. Four books I read in May 2017While a few sleepless nights didn’t hurt the cause,  May was full of page-turning winners! My top two reads are as follows:

The Dollhouse

By far the best book I’ve read thus far this year is The Dollhouse by Fiona Davis, the one title that was not on my TBR list. I was in a browsing mood and clicked the “Try Something Different” link on my local digital library site. The Dollhouse showed up, and I was immediately intrigued by the synopsis:

Fiona Davis’s stunning debut novel pulls readers into the lush world of New York City’s glamorous Barbizon Hotel for Women, where in the 1950s a generation of aspiring models, secretaries, and editors lived side by side while attempting to claw their way to fairy-tale success, and where a present-day journalist becomes consumed with uncovering a dark secret buried deep within the Barbizon’s glitzy past.

When she arrives at the famed Barbizon Hotel in 1952, secretarial school enrollment in hand, Darby McLaughlin is everything her modeling agency hall mates aren’t: plain, self-conscious, homesick, and utterly convinced she doesn’t belong—a notion the models do nothing to disabuse. Yet when Darby befriends Esme, a Barbizon maid, she’s introduced to an entirely new side of New York City: seedy downtown jazz clubs where the music is as addictive as the heroin that’s used there, the startling sounds of bebop, and even the possibility of romance.

Over half a century later, the Barbizon’s gone condo and most of its long-ago guests are forgotten. But rumors of Darby’s involvement in a deadly skirmish with a hotel maid back in 1952 haunt the halls of the building as surely as the melancholy music that floats from the elderly woman’s rent-controlled apartment. It’s a combination too intoxicating for journalist Rose Lewin, Darby’s upstairs neighbor, to resist—not to mention the perfect distraction from her own imploding personal life. Yet as Rose’s obsession deepens, the ethics of her investigation become increasingly murky, and neither woman will remain unchanged when the shocking truth is finally revealed. (Goodreads)

The Barbizon is not only the setting of the story, but also a character in the book. The hotel plays a central role, evolving over time as much as Darby and Rose do. Like its effect on Rose, the Barbizon would not leave me alone; and days after tearing through the book, I found myself pouring over articles about the historical building and its famous residents.

Barbizon Hotel

photo by Dmadeo

A mixture of fascinating history, rich characters, and suspenseful mystery, this is a five-star story. I can’t wait until August, when Davis’s next book is released!

The Princess Diarist

I wonder how different the experience of The Princess Diarist would have been had I read it prior to Carrie Fisher’s death, especially considering the several references she makes to her own “future” obituary. Though her stream of consciousness sometimes bordered on rambling, I found myself wanting more. More sordid behind-the-scenes tales from the filming of Star Wars. More heartfelt (and surprisingly beautiful) poetry about her feelings for Harrison Ford. More Carrie Fisher period. It’s hard to come away from this book and not want to be Carrie’s friend.

What did you read in May? Let me know in the comments – I’m always looking for the next great book!

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