This Week in Books: All the Feels

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Not feeling well this weekend, I got a LOT of reading done. Silver linings and all that jazz.

THEN

It’s incredibly unusual these days for me to read a book in less than 48 hours. I just happened to read two such page-turners back to back this week. Denton Little’s Deathdate by Lance Rubin is delightful! With a clever premise of (most) humans knowing the day they’re going to die, we see how 17-year-old Denton Little chooses to spend his last few days. Surprisingly hilarious, I couldn’t get enough of Denton and his friends, and I can’t wait to read the sequel (yes, you read that right).

During my afternoon with Jay Asher, I knew that I’d like his newest book, What Light, but I had no idea that ALL. THE. FEELS would keep me reading it all night long. Besides being a really sweet romance and a great reminder that people are capable of change and deserve second chances, the premise of being a Christmas tree farmer and having two lives because of it (one on the farm 11 months out of the year and one in another state selling tress on a lot from Thanksgiving to Christmas) was fascinating.

NOW

A dystopian novel about a reality survival show, The Last One by Alexandra Olivia was difficult to get into at first with chapters alternating between the first-person perspective of the main character, Zoo, and an omniscient third-person narrator’s point-of-view (so that we learn about the other contestants of the reality show). Being a fan of Survivor, and reality TV in general, I’m kind of loving the premise. If the twist is what I think it is, the story is much darker than it first appears. I’m about halfway through and am looking forward to seeing where the story takes me.

NEXT

My friend Amy Carol Reeves, author of the awesome YA Ripper trilogy, invited me to Joy Callaway’s book signing on Tuesday where I picked up her hot-off-the-press historical novel, Secret Sisters, about the very first sororities. I can’t wait to dig into this rich history and learn these sisters’ secrets.

What does your week in books look like?

 

Linking up with #TWIB and Mama Kat’s Writing Workshop (Prompt 4: Book Review!)

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Mama’s Losin’ It

 

 

 

 

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An Afternoon with Jay Asher

People who know me on a surface level are always surprised to hear me say that I’m an introvert. But I am (I’ve just become adept at hiding it. Thanks, theatre!), and because of that, I’m not a fan of going to events without knowing that a friend will also be there. I have no problem eating lunch or even going to a movie or a show by myself, but I somehow always manage to talk myself out of going to hear people I really want to see – authors, politicians, etc. – because of this hangup I have. Usually my FOMO (fear of missing out) kicks in when I see others’ photos, and I ultimately regret not making myself go. That’s why I refused to talk myself out of going to see Jay Asher at our local library last month, and I am SO glad!Jay Asher gives a talk at our local library.

When 13 Reasons Why first came out, I was pretty deep in the vampire genre, so it took a few years and a lot of hype before I read it. Once I did, I was just as moved as everyone else. I immediately wished the book had been out while I was teaching high school DOP, though I know I would have had to fight tooth and nail to have taught the book. I thought of a friend who had blamed me for her suicidal thoughts when we were growing up. I thought of countless students who struggled with bullying on a daily basis. The book, and its lesson, that words matter, stayed with me for years. After reading The Future of Us a few years later, I became a self-proclaimed Jay Asher fan.

13 Reasons Why and What Light signed by Jay Asher

Surprisingly funny and incredibly humble, Jay Asher stood before a room full of people of all ages and shared the story of his journey to becoming a published author. He never set out to write serious, issue-laden books; he spent the better part of a decade trying to publish humorous children’s books. He explained that 13 Reasons Why resulted from the marriage of two experiences that happened years apart. The idea for the narrative came first when Asher took his first self-guided audio tour. It struck him that alternating between audio narration and the thoughts of the listener would be an interesting – and unique – way of telling a story. He explained that he didn’t want to use this narrative style as a gimmick and thus sat on the idea until the right story presented itself, which it did several years later when a relative of his attempted suicide. After the inspiration struck to marry these ideas and write, as he had titled the book, Baker’s Dozen (and he had the blessing of his aforementioned relative), he realized that he didn’t know what it was like to be a teenage girl. He invited his wife and a few other women over to talk about their experiences, and he was struck by the similarities of the hardships they endured and how they stuck with the women through all these years.

It took Asher three years to write the book. And it was rejected 12 times.

A young girl in the audience asked how Asher felt about the controversy surrounding his novel, and now the Netflix series. He pointed out that the only way to avoid controversy is to not write the book. He said that based on the number of emails he’s received – from teens who credit the book with saving their lives because it was the first time they realized they weren’t alone; from teens who said the book made them reach out to someone who was struggling; from teens who said they saw themselves in the antagonists and vowed to change – the positive impact trumps the controversy. Even Asher’s relative, the one who inspired him to write the book in the first place, said that she wished his book had been around when she was struggling with suicidal thoughts, but if she had to go through her experience for Asher to write the story and help so many, it was worth it.

It was this kind of feedback at an appearance that inspired part of Asher’s latest novel What Light. The male teen was moved to change after reading 13 Reasons Why, but everyone treated him like he was still his former self.

As an incredibly amateur writer myself, it was fascinating to hear how Asher’s ideas for his stories developed over time and from multiple sources of inspiration. It was also interesting to hear that he doesn’t write in a bubble: He sent a draft of 13 Reasons Why to five different people for very different types of feedback; and when he was stuck on a character’s backstory for What Light, he talked it out with a writer friend during a walk. Much in the fashion of his stories, Jay Asher provided solid advice within the narrative of his publishing journey with refreshing honesty and humor.

After the talk (that I would have gladly listened to for at least another hour), it was book signing time. When the long line dwindled and it was my turn to speak with Jay Asher and get my two books signed, I didn’t tell him about the impact 13 Reasons Why had on me. It seemed trite compared to the girl who a few minutes prior had sobbed that his book saved her life. I instead told him how much I loved The Future of Us – that being a junior in high school in 1996, when the story took place, made the book delightfully nostalgic for me to read. He said that he was in college in 1996 and remembered that his first internet search was Def Leppard. It makes me wonder what mine was…

selfie with Jay Asher

Getting to hear Jay Asher in person was a definite highlight for me. I look forward to the stories he has to offer in the future.

This Week in Books: My first five-star read of 2017

I never intended for this blog to be solely about books, but reading is pretty much all I’ve been doing outside of work and mommying. Cold, wet weather and time changes will do that.

Then: Have you ever read a book that you liked soooo much you simultaneously wanted to see how it ends but you never want it to end? Yeah, that’s how I felt reading Jennifer L. Armentrout’s The Problem with Forever. I finished the book late one night; as soon as I woke up the next morning, I reread the ending – not because I didn’t remember it, but because it was Just. That. Good. I thought about the main characters, Mallory and Rider, throughout the day and was reluctant to start a new book that night because I wasn’t done relishing Armentrout’s perfectly angsty love story.

Now: When I went to update my rating for The Problem with Forever on Goodreads, I discovered that Armentrout released another Lux novel, this time from Daemon’s point-of-view. Needless to say, I downloaded Oblivion (Lux 1.5) five seconds later and am enjoying my return to the world of Luxen and Arum.

Next? I’m in the middle of two other books (The Chemist and A Million Miles in a Thousand Years) that I’ve been ignoring during this latest YA bender, so perhaps I’ll pick one of them back up. Or maybe I’ll just stay off the wagon.

What does your Week in Books look like?

 

Mama’s Losin’ ItWriting Prompt: 2. Book Review!

This post is also linked to #TWIB.

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14 of 2014: the book edition

The silver lining to the cloud that is my child’s aversion to sleep is the amount of reading I’ve done this year. Hoping to read two books a month, I surpassed that goal, reading an average of three books a month for a total of 37 books at the time this was written (a 38th may appear depending upon the next few nights of sleep).

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My favorite 14 books read in 2014 are as follows (ordered by date read):

1. Allegiant by Veronica Roth

Whereas I felt Suzanne Collins’ ending to The Hunger Games trilogy was a copout, I thought Roth ended the Divergent series bravely and perfectly.

2. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

I was surprised to find this touted tear-jerker rather uplifting.

3. Hex Hall by Rachel Hawkins

A fun read, this had a Buffy, the Vampire Slayer type of campiness to it.

4. Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

Romance is not my favorite genre; however, Stephanie Perkins does it right. She made me want to grab my passport and book the next flight to France.

5. City of Heavenly Fire by Cassandra Clare

While not her best in the series, I enjoyed how Clare ended her epic tale.

6. Run to You by Clara Kensie

Told in six installments, this paranormal thriller was full of unexpected twists. It kept me on my toes, as well as the edge of my seat.

7. Lux: Opposition by Jennifer L. Armentrout

A page-turning end to a creative sci-fi series, Lux, Armentrout makes me want to have a close encounter.

8. Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman

This was an eye-opening read about our justice system. Though the TV version has been greatly dramatized, I found the tamer real-life account to be more harrowing.

9. Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Anne Fowler

Having a great fascination with Zelda Fitzgerald since high school, it was fun to read this (admittedly fictional) interpretation of her unusual life.

10. The Eternity Cure by Julie Kagawa

Two of my favorite genres, dystopian YA & vampire YA, are a beautiful marriage in the hands of Kagawa.

11. The Future of Us by Jay Asher

A thought-provoking coming-of-age story about how the present affects the future & how our dreams for the future can affect the present and what it means to be happy. Having been a HS junior in 1996 like the female protagonist, I also loved the nostalgia of this great read.

12. Looking for Alaska by John Green

This book stayed with me. For weeks.

13. Just One Year by Gayle Forman

Forman does a brilliant job showing how just one day can affect a greater expanse of time in one’s life – in this case, one year.

14. A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines

This moving story, reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird and Shawshank Redemption, is so well told, I now want to read everything Gaines has written.

What are your favorite reads from 2014?

RIPPER launch & giveaway (updated with winner)

My friend, Amy Carol Reeves, is having an extra special Easter Sunday as today is also the official release day for her debut young adult novel, Ripper. (Congratulations, Amy!)

A Jack-the-Ripper mystery with a paranormal twist that I never saw coming, Ripper is the beautifully written story of Arabella Sharp, a strong, independent young woman who is well ahead of her Victorian time. As Abbie tries to figure out who the Ripper is while also trying to protect herself and those she cares about, she discovers the truth about her mother and herself (oh, and also falls in love with two hotties along the way). Amy strikes a perfect balance between fast-paced action that kept me turning the page and detailed, imagery-filled settings that made me feel as though I were seeing the world through Abbie’s eyes. My only complaint about the book is that it ended… good thing Amy has been hard at work on the sequel!

One lucky reader will receive a SIGNED copy of Ripper (shipped after the signing on April 21; U.S. residents only). Each of the following will enter you into the giveaway, for a total of seven entries. To complete your entry(s), leave me a comment on this post letting me know which of the following you have done; please include your handles/usernames as appropriate.

Entries must be received by noon EST on Sunday, April 15. The winner will be chosen and announced later that day. Good luck!

Entries are now closed. The winner is the sixth entry, belonging to Sarabeth – congratulations!